Satellite-Based Application For Air Quality Monitoring and Management at National Scale (SAANS)

Ambient PM2.5 exposure climatology in India and vulnerability assessment

Ambient PM2.5 concentration has been estimated from MISR AOD for the period 2000-2015 at daily scale. Exposure has been assessed by overlaying population distribution from Indian Census. Annual PM2.5 exposure is estimated by averaging daily exposure, which is then re-gridded to district level in a statistical software using the district shape files. Figure 1a depicts the mean annual PM2.5 concentration at district level over India. PM2.5 concentration in the districts in Indo-Gangetic Belt exceeds the Indian standard by more than 2 times. Mean annual ambient PM2.5 exposure exceeds Indian standard in 50% districts. The corresponding numbers for WHO-IT1, WHO-IT2, WHO-IT3 and WHO-AQG are 72%, 82%, 97% and 99%. Based on PM2.5 concentration, the districts are classified into 7 vulnerability classes. Vulnerability classes are defined as ‘very low’ (<5th percentile), ‘low’ (5th-10th percentile), ‘moderate’ (10th-25th percentile), ‘high’ (25th-50th percentile), ‘very high’ (50th-75th percentile), ‘severe’ (75th-90th percentile) and ‘extreme’ (>90th percentile) based on 15-year PM2.5 statistics. The districts in the Indo-Gangetic Belt are classified in the ‘very high’, ‘severe’ and ‘extreme’ vulnerability class.


ambient1 ambient5

These Figures are Published in Chowdhury & Dey et al., 2016

Figure 1. (a) Mean annual ambient PM2.5 exposure (in µg/m3) and (b) vulnerability assessment at district level over India for the period 2001-2015. Vulnerability classes are defined as 'very low' (<5th percentile), 'low' (5th-10th percentile), 'moderate' (10th-25th percentile), ‘high’ (25th-50th percentile), 'very high' (50th-75th percentile), 'severe' (75th-90th percentile) and 'extreme' (>90th percentile) based on 15-year statistics.